The Default Config Files Are Bad, So I Rebalanced Them

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This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Robert Wyatt 3 weeks, 6 days ago.

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  • #45251

    Robert Wyatt
    Participant

    What is this?
    Better JinRyuu-Configs is basically a drastic overhaul of the various Jingames mod config files to compliment and enhance the core gameplay mechanics and to promote cooperation and friendly competition between players on multiplayer servers. The idea came from a sudden epiphany while I was playing on a multiplayer server– that I was not playing on a DBC server, but instead that I was playing on a CustomNpcs server that happened to also have DBC on it.

    What does that even mean?
    Because of the confusing way that the DBC and JRMCore config files are set up, most server owners only ever bother to tweak it a tiny bit. The default values for the config files also happen to be extremely grind-heavy, causing tp costs to become absurd after a while. To counter-act this, server owners use CustomNpc quests to award players with large amounts of TP, successfully solving the issue.

    However, it also creates several new, even worse issues.

    Because TP is most efficiently gained in flat amounts from completing quests, and not from punching things, several key game mechanics are made completely useless. First of all, there is no point in using weighted clothing and artificial gravity *at all*. Second, the system discourages fighting and sparring with other players, because you can simply do quests and get four times the TP instead. Third, it requires you to be in a certain location, sometimes at a certain time, in order to get any TP. You can’t train on your own, and there is little variety.

    So how do we solve it, then?

    It all starts with two specific values inside the JRMCore config file: “Attribute Cost Rate” and “‘Tp-Gain-per-Melee’ Rate”.

    ‘Attribute Cost Rate’ is the rate at-which the TP-cost for stats goes up, which is pretty self-explanatory I guess.

    ‘Tp-Gain-per-Melee Rate’ is a bit more complex, and its confusing name doesn’t help. It is a whole-number value that controls how many points into the “Mind” stat until your tp-gain from hitting things goes up. Often, when I tell people that mind also increases how much tp you get, they go like “wait, really? I thought that was a typo.” This indicates that the value is so high that it is barely noticeable, which is bad game-balance.

    We turn both those values down a bit. Not so much as to make training incredibly fast, but enough so that it’s bearable. Then, we tweak the health and ki regen a bit. Then, we leave the meditation skill at its default value, passive, but increase how fast each level regens. Then, we do some more tweaks involving skill costs and what not, applying the same careful, well thought-out method like with the first two values, making it not *too* expensive, but also not *too* cheap, and then a few other miscellaneous changes to values based on feedback I’ve heard over the years.

    How does this effect the game, though?
    So you start the game normally, get to Kami’s lookout, and start increasing your mind stat so you can buy all those radical skills and stuff, right? They’re a bit expensive, but you manage to get fly, jump, and potential unlock at lv 1-2. Normally, this would cause the tp costs for your stats to sky-rocket, causing the player to have to grind in-order to get the rest of their stats up. With this re-balanced config, because you expended so much mind in-order to get more skills, you also have a higher TP-gain. The “shadow-dummy” training option, (and more importantly, fighting mobs and players in general) becomes useful, because now your punches and ki-attacks give you enough TP to make up the increase in stat-costs. This also incentivizes using weighted clothing and artificial gravity, because it allows you to hit things more times before killing them. It also incentivizes fighting enemies that are stronger than you, because you’re able gain more tp since they die or get knocked out slower than things that are weaker. Custom-NPCs would still be a very useful thing to have, but it wouldn’t be *the only* option.

    TL;DR: The most fundamental mechanic of the game, punching things to get stronger, is made far more varied and enjoyable just by carefully changing a few values.

    DOWNLOAD IT NOW!

  • #45255

    5
    Participant

    Configs seem somewhat fine, though I’ve spotted a lot of problems. Your transformation costs are kind of unbalanced, you need to give them a second look to see what forms correspond with what costs. For example, SS is a 1.2x multi, and it costs 5000, whereas arcos can get a 2x multi for just 1000. You also have 9 values for example in saiyan forms even though there are only 7 levels. Also, your mind requirements are way too much, each skill costs 10 mind and transformations around 50. The mind requirement configs don’t determine the exact amount of mind the skill will cost, they determine what percentage of the stat cap will be the mind cost. Also, having 5 Mind increase TP gain by 1 is not optimal, as most points you put into mind feel useless until you invest 5. You can fix this by multiplying all TP costs by 5 and making the Mind to TP thing 1:1.

    And also, one last note, the Attribute TP Cost Gain doesn’t work unless it’s lower than 2.3. The TP Gain cost will always be 2.3, even if the default configs are 1.6, because of something weird in the code. Lowering the value just makes the TP gain take a couple of attribute level ups to kick in. The way to fix this is just to make it way higher.

  • #45266

    Robert Wyatt
    Participant

    Oh crap, thanks for telling me about the arcosian costs. I completely forgot about them. The reason why the initial Super Saiyan costs are so large is to try to make it so that unlocking Super Saiyan at all is difficult, but improving it is easier. Also, I am aware of the mind requirements. They might seem high, but in-game they’re really not so bad. I wasn’t aware of that thing about attribute TP Cost gain. That seems kinda dumb.

    I’ll try to take your other criticisms to heart as well.

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